Why Your Startup Should Create Impact, Not Advertising

Large organizations like Johnson & Johnson for years have a major stake in the ground as an employer and can offer learnings and best practices for businesses who are looking to incorporate advance planning and real-time response efforts into their DNA
Dec 7, 2018 9:15 AM ET
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Large organizations like Johnson & Johnson for years have a major stake in the ground as an employer and can offer learnings and best practices for businesses who are looking to incorporate advance planning and real-time response efforts into their DNA. WhenHurricane Maria hit, they didn't just send product, they turned their resources into a full disaster relief organization. 

"We were uniquely positioned to respond quickly to the impact of Hurricane Maria, as a large global healthcare company and a major employer on the island," said Kathy Wengel, Executive Vice President and Chief Global Supply Chain Officer, Johnson & Johnson. "We knew we needed to help our employees recover quickly to restart operations.  Once it was clear the storm was going to hit we pre-positioned key people and supplies.

J&J chartered 27 flights, carrying over 700 tons of relief and emergency supplies, and 30 ocean containers with 284 tons of supplies. They became a mini government. Of the 3,700 J&J employees, 80 lost their homes. Immediately they set up a fund that enabled other employees from around the world to support them with donations.

In crisis, companies don't care about CSR, they are just trying to help their neighbors, their co-workers, their fellow human beings. But when you look back on these efforts you start to realize that the real reason you attract and retain employees will the impact you create. People want to work somewhere they know they are supported and cared about on a deeper level. 

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