heat pumps

Ontario Announces Major Plan to Combat Climate Change

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - The provincial government of Ontario has announced that it will spend over C$7 billion over the next four years in a broad-based effort to combat climate change that is expected to touch upon nearly every aspect of life. Some of these actions are quite innovative.

Among the actions are the phasing out of the use of natural gas for heating, as well as a number of incentives for everything from electric vehicles to building energy conservation retrofits.

The Climate Change Action Plan contains 32 distinct actions containing a total of 80 policies. Each action contains a price tag and an estimated amount of carbon reduction it is expected to achieve.

Many of the actions will be paid for by the province’s cap and trade system, which is expected to be in place at the beginning of next year.

Overall, the cap and trade system and the action plan are expected to cut emissions from 1990 levels by 15 per cent by 2020, by 37 per cent by 2030 and by 80 per cent by 2050.

Clean Power Plan Emission Targets Will Be Met Regardless of SCOTUS Pick

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - Even as the Supreme Court remains deadlocked over the future of the Clean Power Plan (CPP), the U.S. appears likely to achieve the CPP goals a full 14 years ahead of schedule. That’s according to a story by Daniel S. Cohan and Leah Y. Parks in The Hill. According to the authors, this early arrival will come courtesy of a combination of energy efficiency and alternative sources of energy.

Let’s take a look at the numbers. The CPP is looking for a 32% reduction in electric power generated emissions, relative to 2005, by 2030. As of 2015, emissions had already dropped by 15%. Although we don’t have numbers yet for 2015, we do know that coal use, by far the largest emissions source, dropped by another 12%. However, EIA has projected coal consumption to stabilize and increase slightly in 2017. The reason for this is unclear, but it’s worth noting that EIA has been fairly consistently wrong in their “long run projections.” At present, coal production is down 30% compared to the same period last year.

If the intent of the CPP executive order could be compared to a steady process of moving material from the top of a mountain to the bottom, in this case, moving from coal and other fossil fuels to cleaner sources, market forces have produced the equivalent of an avalanche.

Subscribe to heat pumps