Japan

Sodexo Trends Report Shows Connectivity, Innovation & Uncertainty Are Rewriting the Workplace

(3BL Media/Justmeans) – There are so many trends in the news that it is difficult for businesses to keep track of everything and know what is relevant. Yet it is critical for business and its leaders to be able to recognise the underlying trends driving change, to evaluate their significance and stay ahead of—rather than follow—them.

Will “Floatovoltaics” Become the Next Big Thing?

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - Energy and water keep showing up together in many articles and conversations. We now have the energy-water nexus, which is a term that highlights the interdependencies of the two. Getting water (from wells or desalination plants), moving it around and purifying it, requires a great deal of energy.

G7 Leaders Up the Ante on Climate Action

(3BL Media/Justmeans) When the leaders of the world’s largest economies, United States, Germany, Canada, Japan, Great Britain, France, and Italy, otherwise known as the G7, met last week to discuss the global economy, climate and energy were high on the agenda, given the heightened level of concern and the major climate talks coming up later this year in Paris.

The group took a bold step, pledging to completely phase out greenhouse gas emissions by the century’s end, and to cut somewhere between 40 and 70% by 2050. Can they back it up? Not by themselves. These seven countries currently represent about a third of the world’s GHG emissions. That means they can have a significant impact, but they can’t do it without help, especially from rapidly growing economies like China (now the #1 emitter), India (#4) and Russia (#5). That will not be easy, considering that even among those in the G7, consensus did not come easily. Both Canada and Japan pushed back before finally agreeing to sign on to the statement that said, “We commit to doing our part to achieve a low-carbon global economy in the long-term including developing and deploying innovative technologies striving for a transformation of the energy sectors by 2050 and invite all countries to join us in this endeavor. To this end we also commit to develop long term national low-carbon strategies.”

However, if the goal is to limit global warming to 2 degrees or less, the goal of eliminating emissions by the end of the century is not enough. Even the 40 to 70% cuts mentioned by 2050 will fall short, even at the higher end, according to some sources. The carbon calculus shows that we have used up about two-thirds of the total emissions limit of around 3,200 gigatonnes that must be maintained if we hope to keep the climate from spinning out of control. At the current rate of emissions, we will run through that in the next 27 years. That’s a frightening thought when you consider that, at this point, the rate is still going up (albeit more slowly than it was a few years ago). That trend has to be dramatically reversed if the goal is to be met. Keep in mind that most greenhouse gases remain in the atmosphere for a hundred years or more, so even when we stop emitting, it will take a while for the concentration to begin falling. It also means that when we stop, we need to stop for good, or at least the next hundred years. Given the way that these emissions accumulate in the system, the sooner we act, the better.

The United States Without Nuclear Power

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - With the start of the new session of Congress, there is a lot of maneuvering going on to establish turf and battle lines. Senator Lamar Alexander, long-time Republican senator from Tennessee, now the head of the Sub-committee on Water and Energy Development, has come out with a strong statement regarding the future of nuclear energy in this country.

The speech was entitled “The United States Without Nuclear Power,” and while that sounds like a perfectly reasonable title for an advocate of alternative energy, it was, in fact, anything but. The senator refers to a hypothetical day when the US is without nuclear power and calls it, “a day we don’t want to see in our country’s future.”

It’s not exactly clear who the “we” is that he’s referring, but it’s clear that it’s something that he wants to avoid. He gives three reasons and goes on to tell three stories.

The three reasons are:

  1. We use a lot of electricity (25% of the world total)
  2. Nuclear power provides 20% of that
  3. Since “the world’s leading science academies and many Americans say climate change is a threat,” nuclear currently provides about 60% of the country’s carbon-free power.

These facts are all undeniably true, though they don’t, by any means, add up to the conclusion he draws from them.

The Asian Equation: Solving the Puzzle of Sustainable Investment on the World's Most Complex Continent

Coming soon: The "definitive overview" of institutions with assets under management in Asia integrating ESG criteria

Japanese Banks Extend Biggest-Ever Loan to Grow Nation's Wind Sector

UK wind turbine company to be bought by Japanese PPP for $874 million

Japan produces a lot of energy, ranking third in terms of electricity production after the United States and China. But it has some catching up to do in wind power, ranking 13th in the world in terms of installed wind capacity.

Green NGO Urges Southeast Asian Countries to Embrace Sustainable Energy

It’s been a year since the tsunami that devastated parts of Japan took place. The natural disaster then triggered off a major nuclear accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Plant, reigniting the debate on the safety of nuclear energy.

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