Climate Change Have a New Enemy: The iPhone


Climate change skeptics, beware. The fight against your misinformation just took a technological leap. No, it’s not windmills or solar panels. Skepticalscience.com has recently released an app for both the iPhone and Android phones that looks to shoot down their shoddy take on science. The best part? It’s free!

The science of climate change isn’t always easy to understand. There are intricacies, big concepts, and uncertainties. This sometimes make it hard for people who believe in the evidence to talk about it with skeptics, who are happy to play fast and loose with the facts. Physicist John Cook, the creator of the app at skepticalscience.com, put it together to make it easier to explain away skeptic talking points by making real science more accessible.

In addition to making climate science clearer, the app is also easy to use. It has a simple interface that can help you come up with quick and simple arguments to combat misinformation.

The true ingenuity of the app, though, is its ability to hone in on the weakest link of most skeptical arguments against climate change. The problem with most of their arguments is that skeptics focus on the small details and not the big picture.

For example skeptics often talk about how the Earth’s climate closely follows solar flares. This is true at face value: for many years, even after the Industrial Revolution, the climate was closely correlated with solar cycles. However, since 1970, there has been little correlation with solar cycles. In fact, since 1990, temperatures have risen even as solar activity has fallen.

The bottom line is there’s no one factor that drives the climate system. It’s many things that come together, and now we’ve inserted ourselves into the equation. While the small details are important when making local plans for climate change, the overall trends are important validations of the science. The uncertainties skeptics often point to just aren’t as important as the big picture. The app from skepticalscience.com aims to use these nuances to silence skeptics.

So what are you waiting for? It’s free and easy to use and understand. Go download it and take it for a test drive at your local Tea Party meeting and let us know how it goes!

Photo Credit: Flickr