Detroit Residents Can't Buy Robocop Statue For A Dollar

Communities come together for charities and fundraisers all the time, but when citizens in Detroit raised money for a statue of Detroit hero Robocop, the mayor politely declined. Money raised is being shifted elsewhere, but many want the statue to become a reality.
robocop
The buzz began when the Detroit mayor responded to a tweet that the city should build a statue of the half human half robot crime fighter. When the mayor declined, citizens took to funding startup site Kickstarter to bring Robocop back to the motor city.

The statue became a social media blitz with events on Facebook and other social media sites. Thousands of dollars were raised, but the future of the statue is bleak. A new movement has taken hold to take the money raised and donate it to charity.

The original Robocop was portrayed by Peter Weller and spawned three movies and a television series. They followed the exploits of a police officer who was attacked and left for dead in a future Detroit ruled by criminals. The movies included violence, gore and sexuality, so this may be a reason why the mayor is reticent to erect a statue.

Officer Alex Murphy was transformed into the crime fighting android Robocop and cleaned up the city while dealing with the loss of his human feelings and memories. Detroit is in the midst of a economic downturn and people are reaching out for positive role models and Robocop seems to be on the forefront.

Social enterprise can constantly change and evolve to take into account environmental and legal variables. The money was originally raised for a Robocop statue as a way to raise moral in a city affected by blight and will now benefit charities in the Detroit area.

Other cities have erected statues of fictional characters such as fictional boxer Rocky Balboa and superhero Superman, so what makes Detroit above a half man half robot role model?

Image Source: flickr.com/photos/30693123@N04/3460510452/

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