DiversityInc Ranks Top 50 Companies for Diversity: Novartis, AT&T, Sodexo among Top 10

(3BL Media/Justmeans) – Workforce diversity and inclusion are widely recognized today as a vital driver of business growth and innovation. According to a McKinsey study, companies with diverse managements achieve considerably higher earnings and deliver greater shareholder value.

DiversityInc has released the list of 2016 Top 50 Companies for Diversity to honor companies that have demonstrated an exemplary commitment to diversity across various aspects of their business. More than 1,800 companies participated in the survey in 2016. The survey, now in its 17th year, leads to a detailed, empirically driven ranking.

DiversityInc assessed performance based on four key areas of diversity management: workforce breakdown and recruitment, equitable talent development, CEO and leadership commitment, and supplier diversity. In addition to the Top 50 list this year, DiversityInc unveiled its 25 Noteworthy Companies, which includes companies that have potential to be a Top 50 company next year.

Some of the leading companies in the Top 50 list include Kaiser Permanente, Novartis, AT&T, Sodexo, Prudential Financial, Deloitte, Wells Fargo, Abbott, Accenture, Cox Communications, IBM, Comcast NBC Universal, Toyota, Allstate Insurance, Time Warner, Walt Disney, TD Bank, General Mills, Monsanto, KeyCorp, General Motors, and Medtronic.       

Novartis was chosen for its promotions for women into management, which were nearly 38 percent higher than the Top 10. Supplier diversity at Novartis was double the Top 10 average for minority owned subcontractors and four times the Top 10 average for women owned subcontractors.

At AT&T, the number of African-American, Latinos and Asians in senior leadership was 7.4 percent higher than the Top 10, managers in mentoring were 36.5 percent higher than the Top 10, and supplier diversity was more than double the Top 10 average of prime suppliers who are minority owned.

Sodexo earned a top position on the list because its number of African-American, Latinos and Asians in senior leadership was 14 percent higher than the Top 10, promotions for African-Americans into management was nearly double the Top 10, and the number of African-Americans in senior leadership was double the Top 10 average.

Source: DiversityInc