Harvard Business School Hosts Seminar on Energy

rawiThe issues and challenges faced by a globalized and increasingly regulated energy sector make up the theme of the Global Energy Sector seminar that Harvard Business School (HBS) will be hosting between November 4 and 7 on the Harvard Business School Campus. The event is part of the institution's executive education program, and is aimed at energy leaders and executives who work in the fields of development, technology, utilities, distribution and finance.

The organizers of the seminar will provide attendees with an opportunity to gain insight into business models and supply chain structures that have become increasingly complex due to regulations and state control. Industry experts will discuss the arguments for both diversification and consolidation of energy companies, and analyze the intersections of business and government relations at play within the industry.

The objective is to give participants a holistic knowledge of the factors at play within the energy industry, and help them prepare to implement strategy and innovative solutions to deal with pressing, real-world energy issues.

“Energy leaders worldwide are being asked to address a turbulent geopolitical landscape,” said Rawi Abdelal (pictured), Joseph C. Wilson Professor of Business Administration and faculty co-chair of the Global Energy Seminar. “In a time of heightened environmental consciousness and government oversight, providers need to understand the present risks and opportunities in order to innovate and maintain profitability.”

The seminar will also look at the impact of alternative energy and the impact of incentives for lowering emissions so participants can understand risks and opportunities to remain competitive.

In terms of format, it will combine interactive group discussions and guest lectures, besides HBS’s classic case study method.

Image credit: HBS

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