Li-on Batteries: More Storage Efficiency and Less Carbon

(3BL Media/Just Means) - Electric cars need good batteries to store energy in order to assuage what has become known as ‘range anxiety—that is, the anxiety over running out of power before the destination and having nowhere to plug the car in. The production of renewable energy also requires a reliable battery mechanism to store the surplus power until it can be fed into the power grid.

Li-ion (lithium-ion) batteries are one of the battery solutions enabling the renewable energy and electric vehicle revolution to charge ahead. Its energy density can be twice as high as the density of nickel-cadmium equivalents. More recently, a new type of Li-on batteries hit the market with a 20 percent efficiency increase. Innovations and improvements keep coming in short cycles.​

According to Huntsman, a global manufacturer and marketer of differentiated chemicals, Li-on batteries make renewable energy sources more efficient and cost effective. As to electric vehicles, it “untethers the car from a power-generating source” by efficiently storing energy.

The company says that in order to endure sustained battery performance, high-quality materials are required. It uses ULTRAPURE ethylene carbonate, used as the electrolyte solvent in Li-ion batteries, because it meets the highest standards in the industry today. Huntsman is one of the few manufacturers in the world capable of meeting these standards. It’s the only one in in North America.

Driving electric vehicles and producing renewable energy are some of the current solutions being pursued to reduce GHG emissions. Huntsman says it goes one step further as its carbonates are made with captured CO2. “For every ton of ULTRAPURE ethylene carbonate we produce, 1,000 pounds of it are sequestered CO2 that would otherwise have been released,” the company said in a recent news release.

With better batteries, more charging stations for electric and hybrid vehicles, more efficient materials and policies that incentivize the switch to renewable energy, clean tech is a key component of a possible, sustainable future.​

Image credit: Huntsman

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