New Doc Celebrates Science Teaching in Schools

A new documentary film wants to rescue the wonder in science teaching, making clear links to real life, current issues such as climate change, and solutions that provide us with most modern comforts people take for granted.

Called Where the Wonder Went and made by Adventure Capitalists, the film provides insights into the current state of science education, advocating for a return of science as a hands-on discipline. As a source of inspiration, it highlights exceptional local teachers from Santa Barbara’s Monroe Elementary and Dos Pueblos High School, as well as the Bren School Professor, David Tilman.

The film was made by Bryan Latchford in partnership with Susan Dworsky and Casey O’Hara as their final project for the “Green Screen” class they attended at the UCSB Carsey-Wolf Center in early 2013. The idea came from the producers’ common interest in improving science education and environmental communication in schools.

“Our intent is to show that shifting away from abstract textbook learning and reconnecting science education to the built and natural worlds are crucial to exciting, engaging, and empowering the next generation of science stewards,” said Bryan. W

here the Wonder Went won the Audience Choice award at the 2013 Santa Barbara Digital Film Festival. More recently, it was accepted by the ongoing 2014 Santa Barbara International Film Festival, which runs until Feb. 9. The next screening will be on Thursday (6th) at 10am at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. For those who can’t make it to Santa Barbara, the film can be streamed on YouTube.

Image credit: Adventure Capitalists

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Non-standard font styles will be removed, but basic text formatting like bold and italic will be preserved.

Full HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Non-standard font styles will be removed, but basic text formatting like bold and italic will be preserved.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

FMR Icons

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.