Women and Finance CSR News

Run with Whole Planet Foundation and The Seaweed Bath Co.

Help Entrepreneurs Get Their Businesses Up and Running
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Whole Planet Foundation is warming up for its second annual Virtual 10k Run that takes place next month during August 3-7!  Nearly 100 participants have registered and because the run occurs simultaneously where you are and in the digital sphere, spaces are endless!

Advancing Gender Equality

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BNY Mellon was one of the first financial institutions in the U.S. to do business with women, dating back to the 1870s when we started encouraging women to take control of their finances.

Today, striving for gender equality within and outside our four walls is key to our success. It’s an economic driver that can enhance company performance and generate significant market returns.

Reducing Risk by Encouraging Resilience

by Zoe So, WPF’s Program Manager for the Africa/Middle East region
Blog

Microfinance provides opportunities for borrowers to start and reinvest in businesses; generate income; and carve their own pathways out of poverty. But the path isn’t always so smooth. Poor households are especially vulnerable to economic shocks, ranging from common situations like illness and death in the family, to exceptional crises like health epidemics, natural disasters, and political instability.

New Project Reveals Science Behind Trump Voters' America

Capital Institute's Field Guide to a Regenerative Economy reveals the science behind the revitalization of Tottenville and similarly-neglected communities of Americans who self-identify as voiceless and forgotten.
Press Release

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y., May 9, 2017 /3BL Media/ — Seventy percent of New York City voters threw their support behind Hilary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, and yet 70 percent of Staten Islanders voted for President Donald Trump. No community better represents this dichotomy between New York City’s inner and outer boroughs than Tottenville, a Staten Island hamlet once known as The Town the Oyster Built and now called—by some residents—Forgottenville.

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