American Journal of Preventive Medicine

New State Level Data Demonstrate Geographical Variation in 10-Year Cardiovascular Risk

Information can help target intervention programs, according to report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, November 10, 2014 /3BL Media/ — Public health researchers seeking to determine an individual’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD), or stroke have previously relied on national US data, such as that provided by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). Now, new data compiled and evaluated by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide information at the state level for the first time, paving the way for targeted intervention programs.

Emergency Epinephrine Used 38 Times in Chicago Public Schools

More than half of students had no previous allergic reactions, according to report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, October 23, 2014 /3BL Media/ — The Chicago Public School (CPS) system used emergency epinephrine in 38 cases during the 2012-2013 school year and more than half of these cases were for first-time events. Anaphylaxis, an allergic reaction characterized by trouble breathing, wheezing, and throat closure, can occur within minutes or seconds and can sometimes result in death.

Public Health in the 21st Century

American Journal of Preventive Medicine supplement addresses critical challenges to public health
Press Release

October 16, 2014 /3BL Media/ - Although disease outbreaks and epidemics drawing worldwide attention emphasize the importance and acute need for public health professionals, the world faces a longer-term challenge—a public health workforce that is truly effective in the 21st century. In a new supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, experts address critical challenges to public health, from workforce development, capacity building, partnership and collaborations, and changes and needs in workforce composition.

Soda Tax for Adolescents and Exercise for Children Best Strategies for Reducing Obesity

Twenty-year projection assessing impact of one cent per ounce excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages, exercise, and advertising ban reported in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, August 27, 2014 /3BL Media/ — Childhood obesity in the United States remains high. A tax on sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, energy drinks, sweet teas, and sports drinks would reduce obesity in adolescents more than other policies, such as exercise or an advertising ban, and would also generate significant revenue for additional obesity prevention activities, say researchers writing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The study also demonstrated that physical activity would benefit children ages 6-12 most.

Prioritizing Suicide Research Can Help Lead to Fewer Suicide Attempts and Deaths

Suicide experts recommend research into early behavioral detection, interventions, use of mass media, and other areas, American Journal of Preventive Medicine reports
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, August 18, 2014 /3BL Media/ – In a new supplement to the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, experts address the state of the science on suicide prevention and provide useful recommendations for research to inform effective suicide prevention. Suicide has been a challenging and perplexing public health issue to study as it has many dimensions and underlying factors. Although much is known about the patterns and potential risk factors of suicide, the national suicide rate does not appear to have dropped over the last 50 years.

Vets’ Alcohol Problems Linked to Stress on the Home Front

Returning national guardsmen more likely to turn to alcohol than the general public when faced with issues at home
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, July 31, 2014 /3BL Media/ - Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems — all commonplace in military families. Results of the study by researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health are published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Sibling Composition Impacts Childhood Obesity Risk

Having obese brothers and sisters is more revealing indicator of child obesity than having obese parents, according to new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, July 8, 2014 /3BL Media/ – It is well documented that children with obese parents are at greater risk for obesity. In a new study, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital, Cornell University, and Duke University looked at how different kinds of family associations affect obesity, specifically how sibling relationships affect a child’s weight. They not only found a correlation between parents and child, but also discovered a link between having an obese sibling and a child’s obesity risk, after adjusting for the parent-child relationship.

Bisexual Men Face Unique Challenges to Their Sexual Health

New study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine takes an in-depth look at the sexual and social experiences of men who have sex with men and women (MSMW)
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, June 23, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Bisexual men have many unmet public health needs, which leave them vulnerable to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and other health problems. This new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) illuminates the behavioral, interpersonal, and social realities of men who have sex with men and women (MSMW), and it explores possible interventions to better serve their needs. The findings are published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Fewer Smokers Believe E-Cigarettes Are a Safer Alternative to Cigarettes

Investigators find rise in overall e-cigarette awareness, but note decline in the perceived safety of the devices, according to new data published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, May 19, 2014 /3BL Media/ – E-cigarettes are gaining mainstream attention as a competitor to traditional cigarettes. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign wanted to examine changes in e-cigarette awareness, how harmful people believe them to be, and if those attitudes have any connection to smoking cessation attempts. They found that while awareness of e-cigarettes has increased significantly, smokers are less inclined to consider them safer than cigarettes.

Early Obesity Linked to Increased Probability of Severe Obesity Later in Life

Being obese at age 25 increases risk for serious weight problems over 35 years of age according to new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, May 6, 2014 /3BL Media/– Exposure to long-term obesity has become more common with increases in obesity at younger ages. Researchers examined the relationship between BMI at age 25, obesity later in life, and biological indicators of health. They found that people who were obese by age 25 had a higher chance of more severe obesity later in life, but that current weight, rather than the duration of obesity, was a better indicator of cardiovascular and metabolic risk. Their findings are published in the June issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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