American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Snowstorms and Power Outages Present Elevated Risk for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

More Public Safety Education Needed to Decrease Unintentional Poisoning During and After Heavy Storms, According to New Data Published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, April 8, 2014 /3BL Media/ - While preventable, carbon monoxide poisoning is a serious and sometimes fatal condition. Large weather events, such as snowstorms and heavy storms that cause power outages, can lead to an increase in the number of reported carbon monoxide exposures. Researchers from Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut explored the link between these major storms and the rise in carbon monoxide exposure cases.

New USDA School Meal Standards Positively Impact Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Low-Income Students

Concern from lawmakers and the public regarding possible food waste unfounded, according to new data published In the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, March 4, 2014 /3BL Media/ – With nearly 32 million American students receiving government-subsidized meals every day, getting children the nutrition they need is a priority for schools as well as legislators. In the fall of 2012, revamped school lunch guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) went into effect. New standards necessitate increased availability of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, require students to select either a fruit or vegetable as one of their lunch items, and mandate larger portion sizes for fruits and vegetables.

New Study Explores Contributors to Excess Infant Mortality in the U.S. South

Efforts to reduce sudden unexpected infant death and prematurity can help close the gap
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, February 4, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Researchers consider infant mortality to be a key indicator of population health. Currently, the United States ranks 27th among industrialized nations in infant mortality, but rates within the U.S. vary significantly by race, socioeconomic status, and geography. In particular, the Southern states suffer from high rates of infant mortality, along with several other negative population health indicators such as obesity and diabetes.

Perceived Benefits of Electronic Cigarettes Over Traditional Tobacco Products May Lead to Higher Experimentation Rates

New study finds link between common beliefs and e-cigarette use among young adults
Press Release

Ann Arbor, MI, January 8, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Despite years of anti-smoking education and legislation, tobacco use still remains an important public health issue in the United States. In 2010, 25.2% of all adults and 35.6% of young adults reported current tobacco use. While anti-tobacco efforts continue across the county, the introduction of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has been marketed as a less harmful alternative to cigarettes and also as a smoking cessation aid.

Majority of Americans Avoid Addressing End-of-Life Issues, According to New Study

Age, race, education level, and health status impact Advance Directive Completion
Press Release

San Diego, CA, December 10, 2013 /3BL Media/ – During the past two decades, high-profile legal cases surrounding end-of-life decisions have received widespread attention in the United States, prompting increased media focus and numerous debates on the subject.

New Study Analyzes Sharp Rise in U.S. Drug Poisoning Deaths By County

Investigators look at the link between geographic patterns and death rates in the new issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

San Diego, CA, November 12, 2013 /3BL Media/ – A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine gives new insight into the geographic variation in drug poisoning mortality, with both urban centers and rural areas showing a large increase in death rates. While previous studies have looked at drug poisoning related deaths in broad strokes, this is the first study to examine them on the county level across the entire U.S.

New Study Shows Link Between Car Crashes and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

Latest data highlights risks of driving without a seat belt for expectant mothers in new issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

San Diego, CA, October 8, 2013 – A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine indicates that motor vehicle crashes can be hazardous for pregnant women, especially if they are not wearing a seat belt when the accident occurs.

Background Mortality Rates Key to Accurate Reporting of Vaccine Safety Risks

Collaborative study utilizing Vaccine Safety Datalink published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Press Release

San Diego, CA, June 11, 2013 /3BL Media/ – In a study using the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD), investigators analyzed four years of data and determined that background mortality rates (rates of death irrespective of cause) are crucial in interpreting the numbers of deaths following vaccination. The VSD mortality rate following immunization is lower than the general US population mortality rate, and the causes of death are similar. These background rates can be used in communications to the public about vaccine safety risks, reports the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Nutritional Quality at Fast-Food Restaurants Still Needs Improvement

New 14-year study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine reports
Press Release

San Diego, May 7, 2013 /3BL Media/ - More than 25 percent of American adults chow down on fast food two or more times each week. Known for menu items containing high amounts of fat, sugar, and salt, fast-food restaurants have contributed to America’s poor diets and increased risk of diet-related chronic diseases, like heart disease and diabetes.

Promising Strategies to Reduce Use of Indoor Tanning Devices and Prevent Skin Cancer

CDC papers discuss the potential roles of social and family networks, media, and lawmakers in efforts to prevent skin cancer by reducing use of indoor tanning devices, American Journal of Preventive Medicine reports
Press Release

San Diego, CA, May 7, 2013 – Preventing skin cancer by reducing use of indoor tanning devices requires a coordinated approach at the national, state, and local levels suggests a pair of papers by CDC authors in a special theme issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Evidence has shown that use of indoor tanning devices increases the risk of developing skin cancer, including melanoma, and these papers discuss approaches that could help reduce use of indoor tanning devices and prevent future incidence of skin cancers.

Pages

Subscribe to American Journal of Preventive Medicine