farming

50 Farms and No Regrets

Iroquois Valley Farms Organic Farmland REIT
Blog

by Teresa Opheim, Senior VP, Iroquois Valley Farms 

Iroquois Valley Farms has reached a milestone: This spring we added the 50th farm to our portfolio. Our farmland REIT — honored as a “Best for the World” company from B Labs — provides secure land tenure for 35 farm families working nearly 9,000 acres of farmland. More families will be joining the Iroquois Valley Farms fold soon.

Engage the Chain: An Investor Guide to Engaging the Food Sector on Sustainability Risks

Article

By Brooke Barton, Senior Director, Ceres 

In April, Greenpeace released video footage showing that a palm oil supplier for major food companies, the Hayel Saeed Anam Group was destroying large swaths of rainforest in Indonesia, despite concerted efforts by industry stakeholders to stop forest destruction in palm oil supply chains. The repercussions for Hayel Saeed Anam Group are still unfolding, but recent history suggests that the outcome may well involve financial consequences.

We Can’t Afford Simplistic, Binary Thinking When It Comes to Food Production

Article

As head of R&D for a major vegetable seed company, I get to travel around the world to meet with farmers and many other veggie-loving stakeholders from across the food chain. Thanks to events hosted by our seed brands, De Ruiter and Seminis, I’ve had the pleasure of interacting with vegetable suppliers, grocery retailers, restaurateurs, renowned chefs, food writers/bloggers, and other stakeholders.

Agroforestry Gives Kenyan Indigenous Community a Lifeline

Summary: 
  • The Cherangani people of Kenya were for generations reliant on the forest for hunting, gathering and agroforestry — a way of life that was curtailed by the colonial government.
  • Today, Cherangani communities living on the edge of the forest have returned to their traditions, intercropping avocado, bean and coffee plants among trees that help reduce water runoff and soil erosion, and improve nutrient cycling.
  • The return to agroforestry has had wide-ranging benefits, from helping the communities improve their livelihoods, to minimizing human-animal conflicts by providing a buffer of fruit trees between the farms and forest.
  • The project has received $5 million in funding, which is expected to provide training to more than 2,000 households on forest conservation and agroforestry techniques.
Article
  • The Cherangani people of Kenya were for generations reliant on the forest for hunting, gathering and agroforestry — a way of life that was curtailed by the colonial government.
  • Today, Cherangani communities living on the edge of the forest have returned to their traditions, intercropping avocado, bean and coffee plants among trees that help reduce water runoff and soil erosion, and improve nutrient cycling.
  • The return to agroforestry has had wide-ranging benefits, from helping the communities improve their livelihoods, to minimizing human-animal conflicts by providing a buffer of fruit trees between the farms and forest.
  • The project has received $5 million in funding, which is expected to provide training to more than 2,000 households on forest conservation and agroforestry techniques.

Empowering a California Asparagus Farmer to Conserve Water Through IoT Connectivity

By Swathy Ramaswamy, Lead Product Marketing Manager, IoT for Good, AT&T
Blog

Being an organic farmer can be challenging. Farmers are faced with constant pricing pressures from conventional competitors and, in places like California, water limitations and labor shortages also can be an obstacle. That’s why many organic farmers are looking for solutions to help them be more innovative and efficient in growing their crops.

First Online GLOBALG.A.P. Spanish-Language Training Debuts

SCS Global Services' self-paced course meets global market demand
Press Release

EMERYVILLE, Calif., May 7, 2018 /3BL Media/ – SCS Global Services (SCS), a leading food safety training center and certifier, is now offering the first online training course in Spanish for the GLOBALG.A.P. food safety standard, “IFA for Fruits and Vegetables.” GLOBALG.A.P. is an internationally recognized set of farm standards dedicated to good agricultural practices and recognized by the Global Food Safe Initiative (GFSI).  

From Dairy Farm Girl to Attorney for General Mills

Summary: 

Editor’s note: This is the latest post in our “You Grow, Girl!” series highlighting female farmers – from the northern reaches of Canada to the heartland of the U.S. From the western coast of Africa to the rolling hills of France and beyond. The series amplifies the voices of female farmers, who play vital roles in agriculture worldwide. Here, they share their unique perspectives on food, family and farming. This post is from Annette Frawley.

Blog

Editor’s note: This is the latest post in our “You Grow, Girl!” series highlighting female farmers – from the northern reaches of Canada to the heartland of the U.S. From the western coast of Africa to the rolling hills of France and beyond. The series amplifies the voices of female farmers, who play vital roles in agriculture worldwide. Here, they share their unique perspectives on food, family and farming. This post is from Annette Frawley.

Nepal Makes Progress Towards a National Agroforestry Policy

The landlocked mountainous nation will become the second country in the world to have a national agroforestry policy, with support from the World Agroforestry Centre and the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)
Blog

The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) is assisting with the development of a national agroforestry policy for Nepal along with the Climate Technology Centre and Network.

In November 2017, an inter-ministerial coordination committee, of which ICRAF is a facilitating member, organized a series of consultations on how the policy could tackle barriers restricting widespread adoption of agroforestry.

A Pick and a Spade May Triple Farmers’ Yields in the Kenyan Drylands

A simple farming technique is proving effective in staving off food shortages in Kenya
Blog

The female farmers of Makueni County in southeastern Kenya rarely expect to triumph over their parched, unpropitious soils. A pick, a spade and a jovial, no-nonsense, will-to-survive scarcely seem sufficient for a transition to greener prospects. In addition, the need for cash frequently robs these hardy women of their men’s presence; casual labour in economic hotspots, or other work in livestock and poultry trading, is the norm. Producing the food thus rests on the shoulders of the women, many of whom are subsistence farmers or smallholders burdened with increasingly unproductive land.

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