General Mills

A Pet Pig and a Lifetime of Lessons on the Farm

By Ramona Kastenbauer
Summary: 

Editor’s note: This is the latest post in our “You Grow, Girl!” series highlighting female farmers – from the northern reaches of Canada to the heartland of the U.S. From the western coast of Africa to the rolling hills of France, and beyond. The series amplifies the voices of female farmers, who play vital roles in agriculture worldwide. Here, they share their unique perspectives on food, family and farming.

For this post, we reached out to Ramona Kastenbauer, who grew up on a farm in rural central Minnesota and today uses life lessons she learned on the farm in her role as administrative services coordinator at General Mills in Minneapolis, Minnesota. For many guests at World Headquarters, Kastenbauer is the first person they will meet when they check in at the visitor reception desk. When you learn how she was raised, you’ll see why she’s a perfect representative of General Mills, as she lives and breathes our corporate values.

Blog

Editor’s note: This is the latest post in our “You Grow, Girl!” series highlighting female farmers – from the northern reaches of Canada to the heartland of the U.S. From the western coast of Africa to the rolling hills of France, and beyond. The series amplifies the voices of female farmers, who play vital roles in agriculture worldwide. Here, they share their unique perspectives on food, family and farming.

For this post, we reached out to Ramona Kastenbauer, who grew up on a farm in rural central Minnesota and today uses life lessons she learned on the farm in her role as administrative services coordinator at General Mills in Minneapolis, Minnesota. For many guests at World Headquarters, Kastenbauer is the first person they will meet when they check in at the visitor reception desk. When you learn how she was raised, you’ll see why she’s a perfect representative of General Mills, as she lives and breathes our corporate values.

Empowering Farmers to Self-Assess Agricultural Practices

By Christina Skonberg
Blog

Up to 1/3 of global greenhouse gas emissions stems from the food system, an estimated 80% of which comes from agriculture.[1]

A similar story plays out across our General Mills value chain: 50% of our greenhouse gas footprint comes from agriculture. As a food company, our biggest opportunity for positive impact lies at the farm level of our supply chain.

Our commitment to advance regenerative agriculture on 1 million acres by 2030 builds on decades of work by employees past and present to prioritize the people and places growing our ingredients.

ReFED Announces Cohort for Industry-First Nonprofit Food Recovery Accelerator

The diverse group of ten food recovery nonprofits come from eight states across the U.S. and range from established food banks to young startups that leverage concepts from the sharing economy for recovering wasted food in a dignified, scalable way.
Press Release

SAN FRANCISCO, September 5, 2019 /3BL Media/ — Today, ReFED, the only U.S. nonprofit wholly dedicated to reducing food waste, announced the cohort of ten organizations that will participate in its Nonprofit Food Recovery Accelerator.

Across Europe and Australia, General Mills Employees Help Alleviate Hunger

Multimedia with summary

Across Europe and Australia, General Mills and our employees are helping to feed those facing hunger by supporting the Global Foodbanking Network, Food Bank Australia and the European Food Banks Federation and their members.

Learn more about the General Mills Foundation's work here

About General Mills

How the General Mills Foundation is Mobilizing a Global Volunteer Workforce

Multimedia with summary

The General Mills Foundation’s (GMF) executive director, Nicola Dixon discusses GMF’s award winning partnership with Partners in Food Solutions (PFS). 

Healthy Soil, Healthy Planet

Multimedia with summary

Our business and our planet depend on healthy soil. Soil is imperative for farmers to cultivate healthy crop yields, which General Mills then uses to make food people love. And healthy soil is critical to meeting increasing demands on food, fuel and fiber as our global population grows.

To date, General Mills has invested over $4 million in initiatives to improve soil health.

From Minnesota to Africa, Local Nonprofit Connects Food Experts Worlds Apart

Minnesota-based Partners in Food Solutions connects U.S. food experts with smaller African companies looking for new ways to feed large populations.
Article

By Kristen Leigh Painter

The audio crackled as the web-based technology strained to connect people worlds apart. Some voices were louder than others. Some suddenly dropped. But Rose Barry managed to catch promising partial sentences about peanut butter.

“The peanut butter installation ...” (static) “ ... started operating about a day ago ...”(dead air) “We had a bit of a breakdown ...” (static) “The mix is working really well.”

Big Change for Box Tops

By Kevin Hunt
Blog

No more clipping Box Tops and sending them to school.

A new and improved Box Tops for Education mobile app, officially launched last month, is now being used to scan store receipts.

No doubt, it’s a big change.

But the goal of the program remains the same – to help schools earn money from purchases of participating products.

The app will automatically identify Box Tops products and instantly add cash to your school’s earnings online, giving you visibility to see how you’re supporting your school in real-time.

From Office to Field: A Trip to Stoney Creek Farm

By Hanna Johnson
Blog

Some General Mills employees recently got an up-close look at what it means to practice regenerative agriculture, and it didn’t happen from their desks.

Nearly 50 employees from our Foundation, Sustainability, Sourcing, Snack and Cereal teams traveled to Stoney Creek Farm in Redwood Falls, Minnesota. There, they met the Breitkreutz family – leaders in the regenerative agriculture movement – who shared the lessons, challenges and successes on their journey from conventional to regenerative farming.

When Less Is More

By Mary Jane Melendez
Blog

It’s natural to talk about how we’re all doing more: innovating more, making more investments, having more to say in more areas of expertise. But while at the Aspen Ideas Festival earlier this summer, I was challenged to share where General Mills is doing less.

It made me think.

Many of the things we’re doing less of are just as important as – or more important than – the things we’re doing more of.

Here are the top five things I’m proud to say General Mills is doing less of today.

Pages

Subscribe to General Mills