Harvard Business School

Sustainable Investing: The Enduring Revolution

Outlook for 2020 and Beyond
Blog

by Leslie Samuelrich, President of Green Century Funds 

The climate crisis is precipitating a sustainable investment revolution, and I think that revolution will endure in 2020.

When the environmentally-responsible mutual fund company that I lead was founded in 1991, the average investor was not concerned about sustainability. Times have changed. Nearly 80 percent of respondents to a recent study said that they “love the idea of investing in companies that care about the same issues” as them. This isn’t just lip service.

Nominate a World-Changing Company for 2017 Fortune Change the World List

Fortune to honor 50 companies creating positive social impact through core business activities
Blog

For the third year in a row, Fortune will publish the Change the World List which spotlights the top 50 companies that address major social problems as a core part of their business strategy and innovation activities. The Shared Value Initiative and our parent organization, FSG, serve as research partners on this list and are seeking company nominations for 2017 which will be published in September. To be considered for the 2017 Change the World List, please complete the nomination form by June 30, 2017.

Sustainable Investing: From Bugs to Biodrying

An explosion of innovation is happening among the future leaders of sustainable finance.
Blog

The demand for sustainable investing has grown to the point where it vastly outstrips the supply of investment-ready projects. This imbalance is among the reasons why Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management founded this challenge in 2011.

UN Figueras to HBS Alums: Elites Can Change the World…And Invest in Change

By Carol Pierson Holding and Cynthia Figge
Blog

We are inspired by a call with Harvard Business School alumni, Dan Abbasi, low carbon investor and executive producer of the Emmy-winning television series on climate change called “Years of Living Dangerously,” and Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Fifty of us listened as Figueres briefed us on the status of climate change action and expectations for the UN talks this week.

Live from New York: Watch the Shared Value Leadership Summit

Michael Porter, Tony Elumelu, and other cross-sector leaders to discuss the future of shared value on May 13th at 8:30am EST.
Summary: 

Mark your calendars for Tuesday, May 13th, 8:30 am EST: sharedvalue.org/livestream

Blog

Mark your calendars for Tuesday, May 13th, 8:30 am EST: sharedvalue.org/livestream

Social Mission Driven

Harvard Business School offers social enterprise programs for executives
Article

As more nonprofits compete for less funding, the role of social enterprise is being redefined. Business and board leaders must be equipped to tackle increasingly complex missions—from biofuels to healthcare to micro lending. These Harvard Business School Executive Education programs deliver the strategies that you need to create stakeholder value and drive organizational performance.

The Future of Energy Requires Perspective

Article

Examine the emerging business models, technological innovations, and industry challenges facing energy companies worldwide at Global Energy Seminar, an executive education program at Harvard Business School. Topics that will be addressed include the production of biofuels from sugar cane in Brazil, the impact of the U.S. presidential election on domestic and world energy policies, and the controversy surrounding shale gas fracking.

Is Shale Energy the Future?

HBS faculty discuss the implications of shale-gas fracking on the global energy landscape
Article

Shale gas is being widely tapped in the U.S., but whether and to what extent other countries, ―particularly in Europe and China, ― will adopt it remains unclear. Although estimates vary as to how much of this unconventional and controversial fuel is bound up in domestic shale formations, natural-gas prices are likely to remain low for the time being.

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