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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month: The Journey to Becoming an Engineer

Blog

Karla Bracamonte, a Mexican immigrant, worked as a custodian at Arizona State University. One day, she walked past a whiteboard with unfinished algebraic equations written on it.

“I turned to my coworker at the time and I told them, ‘I can do this,’” Bracamonte said.

Realizing her talent, a professor and her coworkers encouraged her to apply for classes at ASU, where university staff could get discounts on tuition. However, as a first-generation college student with very little understanding of English, she had barriers to overcome.

Intel Brings First WiSci Girls STEAM Camp to the U.S.

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WiSci (Women in science) Girls STEAM Camp brings together a group of girls, from middle school or high school, who have the same mindset for learning essential STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math) skills. Important skills include understanding their core values, presenting themselves professionally, and cultivating speaking skills.

Learn more here

About Intel

Panel Discussion: Why Taking a Risk With External Partners Can Be Good Business

Article

In today’s business environment, every organization must take risks to thrive and grow in uncertainty. The big question is: What is the risk appetite and how much exposure is acceptable and manageable? As our business ecosystems expand and integrate further with emerging interdependencies, that question holds added importance for the many parties with whom we interact.

Intel's Mike McDonnell, Sr. Manager Supply Chain Sustainability joined Gartner for a webinar to discuss how Intel is determining risk in its supply chain to fight modern slavery.

Equality Day: Intel Helps Young Women Experience Tech

Article

On this Women’s Equality Day in the U.S., imagine the reaction if you mixed 54 girls and a bunch of Intel employee-mentors at a weeklong camp about robotics, drones, coding, artificial intelligence and more.

“Thank you for teaching us!” camper Ana Maria Santos wrote.

Technology for Social Impact

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For Intel, social impact is about empowering employees to apply their time, talent, and technology. In 2017, the Intel Foundation established an Intel Employee Service Corps team around rebuilding communities that could potentially be applied to disaster response scenarios.

Learn more about the Intel Employee Service Corps at http://intel.com/foundation

About Intel

The Catalytic Power of Transparency in Creating a Diverse Workforce

Q&A with Barbara Whye, Intel’s Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer
Article

By Michelle Mullineaux

The data clearly suggests that companies are not ready to disclose their progress on D&EO. We were eager to explore why, what’s working in corporate America, and how we might help equip business leaders looking to lead on this critical issue, so we reached out to Barbara Whye, Intel’s Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer and VP of Human Resources.

Intel Foundation Supports the First U.S. WiSci STEAM Camp for Middle School Girls

By Pia Wilson-Body, President, Intel Foundation
Blog

“One Intel” is not a bumper sticker, it’s not a slogan, it is action that exemplifies how we bring Intel employees, resources and technology together to solve real world problems. Last week, at the Women in Science (WiSci) STEAM Camp in Bend, Oregon – we did just that. The U.S. State Department, Intel , Girl Up, along with other partners, founded WiSci STEAM Camps in 2015. Over the past four years, we’ve supported camps in Rwanda, Peru, Malawi, Namibia and Georgia.

Gladiators of Change: Through the Looking Glass of Global Diversity & Inclusion

Blog

This blog was guest written by Nathalie Bulos, Joyce Weiner, and Sunita Utgikar.

The business reasons for increasing diversity are well documented. According to research, nonhomogeneous teams are smarter than homogeneous ones1 and a diverse workforce generates more revenue and accelerates business ingenuity2.  As the world grows ever more diverse, it only makes sense for companies to expand representation to serve these markets more effectively3.

How Intel Uses Its Supply Chain to Fight Modern Slavery

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We've worked with suppliers to build a strong system to detect and address forced and bonded labor in our supply chain. Our policies require no employee passports to be withheld and no fees charged to workers to obtain or keep their employment. To date, these policies have resulted in $14 million in fees returned by suppliers to workers.

Intel's Commitment to Responsible Minerals Sourcing

Article

Like many companies in the electronics industry, Intel and our suppliers use minerals in manufacturing. In 2008, we began work to ensure that our supply chain does not source certain minerals—in particular, tantalum, tin, tungsten, and gold (3TG)—within the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) or adjoining countries from mines under the control of armed groups who exploit mine workers to fund crimes against humanity.

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