New York Times

Board Diversity: Time’s Up on Good Intentions

Article

by Julie Gorte, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Impax Aseet Management and Pax World Funds 

When I began working to make boards more gender diverse in 2001, the percentage of women on the boards of large companies in the United States was around 12 percent. By 2011, women had gained a few more seats at the table, and by 2016 women held 21 percent of board seats at Fortune 500 companies. At this rate of progress — less than one percent increase per year — it will be three more decades before big companies’ boards achieve gender parity. And that, sadly, is the good news.

David Schwimmer, David Gelles, Asher Jay, and More to Speak at BSR18

Blog

BSR has announced a new set of keynote speakers and other new program information for the BSR Conference 2018, taking place November 6-8 in New York:

Mars, Inc., Associate Lauren Belomy Featured in New York Times' Vocations

Lauren Belomy works for Mars, Inc., in New York. “My job,” she said, “is to help move the company forward in a world that’s digital.”
Article

Lauren Belomy, a Digital Transformation Associate, who works for Mars, Inc., describes her roles as helping the company to move forward in a world that's ditial. 

We're a traditional manufacturing company, and we need to be ready for the future, she explains in this week's Vocations column of The New York Times.

As U.S. Sheds Role as Climate Change Leader, Who Will Fill the Void?

By Lisa Friedman
Article

When President Trump announced in June that the United States would withdraw from the Paris agreement, America officially ceded its global leadership on climate change.

The retreat had actually begun months earlier, when climate change disappeared from most government websites and vanished from America’s domestic and international agendas. No longer would the United States federal government address climate change at home or raise global warming with ministers and heads of state, as former President Barack Obama and his cabinet routinely did.

As U.S. Sheds Role as Climate Change Leader, Who Will Fill the Void?

By Lisa Friedman
Article

When President Trump announced in June that the United States would withdraw from the Paris agreement, America officially ceded its global leadership on climate change.

The retreat had actually begun months earlier, when climate change disappeared from most government websites and vanished from America’s domestic and international agendas. No longer would the United States federal government address climate change at home or raise global warming with ministers and heads of state, as former President Barack Obama and his cabinet routinely did.

Erb Institute | Business for Sustainability Experts in the News - Can Hollywood Movies About Climate Change Make a Difference?

Article

“Typically, if you really want to mobilize people to act, you don’t scare the hell out of them and convince them that the situation is hopeless,” said Andrew Hoffman, professor of management and organizations, and environment and sustainability, commenting on the way climate change is often depicted in Hollywood movies.”

Strangers Help a Wheelchair Racer (and Find Out Later She’s a Gold Medalist)

Article

The mystery of the Chinese Paralympic champion in the New York City Marathon took a while to unravel.

The champion, Zou Lihong, was supposed to re-enact a great showdown from the Rio Games, where she beat the favored American, Tatyana McFadden, by a hair in the wheelchair marathon. But when McFadden crossed the Central Park finish line as the champion on Sunday, she hadn’t seen Zou for miles. None of the competitors had. Questions to a race official yielded no clue as to what had happened.

Prepare for Deep Dive when Pitching Sustainability to New York Times

By Dave Armon, 3BL Media CMO
Blog

One of the best punchlines delivered so far at BSR Conference came from New York Times sustainability reporter David Gelles when panelists were asked to recommend new breakthrough communications techniques.

The Grey Lady and The EPA

Multimedia with summary

For the better part of the past decade, The New York Times and The Environmental Protection Agency have been frequent punching bags of the right wing. Conservatives allege that The Grey Lady has an open liberal bias and that the EPA is run by tree huggers who care more about owls than jobs. But this week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Joe Romm of Climate Progress, who is angered by what he believes is a front page hit piece on the EPA by that bastion of liberal journalism, The New York Times.

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