Nobel Prize

‘Drinkable, Pure, Safe’: The Business Bringing Affordable Clean Water to Bangladesh

Watersprint purifies contaminated water using technology based on blue LEDs, a development that won the Nobel prize in 2014. A collaboration with local entrepreneurs is bringing the tech to Bangladesh
Article

Across Bangladesh, water is readily available to 97% of the population, but it is not always fit for human consumption. As such, 4 million people do not have access to safe drinking water.

From Amgen to the Atacama to Academia: An Unexpected Trajectory

Blog

For new Amgen Scholars thinking about the next 10 years, it might feel nearly impossible to imagine where they’ll be. Perhaps their research will lead them to academia, perhaps a biotech startup, perhaps policy – the options may feel endless. This unpredictability resonates for one alumna who was part of the first cohort of the Amgen Scholars program in 2007 and took an unexpected trajectory to where she is now.

Meet Amgen Scholar Mentor Randy Schekman, PhD

Blog

Randy Schekman, PhD

Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Berkeley

Winner of 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Growing up, Randy Schekman was always enthusiastic about math and science. But the 2013 Nobel Prize winner in physiology or medicine—for his fundamental work showing how proteins move within cells and are secreted—first developed a passion for bench biology as an undergraduate. 

Meet Randy Schekman, PhD - a Professor, Nobel Prize Winner and Amgen Scholar Mentor

Blog

Growing up, Randy Schekman was always enthusiastic about math and science. But the 2013 Nobel Prize winner in physiology or medicine—for his fundamental work showing how proteins move within cells and are secreted—first developed a passion for bench biology as an undergraduate.

Nobel Prize Goes to Inventors of Blue LED: Why It Was Revolutionary

Blue-light innovation paved the way for a transformation in lighting efficiency
Article

The 2014 Nobel Prize in physics went Tuesday to three scientists who gave lighting a makeover by inventing blue LED lights. The award recognizes a seemingly commonplace innovation, but one that has paved the way for a sea change in lighting efficiency that is under way around the world.

Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, and Shuji Nakamura developed the blue light-emitting diode (LED) in Japan in the early 1990s, triggering a "fundamental transformation of lighting technology," according to a press release from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which awarded the prize.

Scientists Receive First-Ever Breakthrough Prize in Life Science

By David Sampson
Blog

We learned this week that eleven scientists have been named as the first-ever recipients of research prizes given by four technology giants, including Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and Google co-founder Sergey Brin, and that among them are some familiar names to people working in our research program.

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