pollinators

Let’s Bee Real

We need bees to survive. Here’s how to join the hive-minded
Article

By Alyssa Shelasky

Say the word “bees!” and many people around the world will think “ouch!,” or maybe they’ll hear an imaginary buzzing sound or smack their lips at the thought of sweet, sweet honey. What they probably won’t dwell on is the need to ensure the future of these very helpful insects.

How Two Companies Save Bees

By: Susan Golder
Article

Most of us remember our last encounter with a bee. Maybe you can recall the pain of being stung or the effort you made to avoid the furry, flying insects. Today, people and corporations around the world aren’t dodging bees but are instead inviting them onto their property for compelling reasons.

WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL ABOUT BEES?

The Buzz on Why PSE&G Studies Bees

By Lauren Ugorji - Lead Writer, PSE&G
Blog

More than 75% of plants on earth require the help of a pollinator, such as a bee, butterfly or bat, to reproduce. Some experts estimate that these pollinators are responsible for one in every three bites of food humans eat. Unfortunately, many pollinators, especially bees, are in decline, which is threatening food production and other critical human needs.

Bees Help Grow Over 35 Percent of Our Food Crops. Meet the Woman Trying to Save Them.

Beth Robertson-Martin and General Mills are working to protect pollinators—and our food supply.
Article

By Jane Black

One June day in 2014, Beth Robertson-Martin found herself standing on a dirt road dividing two California tomato fields. On one side sat a farm that was nothing more than a 300-acre carpet of dried-out dirt. "It looked like a scene from Mad Max," she remembers. "Everything was dead." On the other side was a 6-foot-tall hedgerow, a tangle of white-blossomed milkweed, sunflowers and elderberry bushes that General Mills had planted alongside the tomatoes to create a habitat for bees, butterflies and other pollinators.

General Mills Brings Pollinator Conservation, Education to Brazil

By Daniel Teles
Article

Did you know that bee extinction could end life on earth? Without pollination from bees, the world’s food production would be completely compromised and negatively impact the ecosystem, agriculture and food production for humans.

Encouraging the Not-So-Secret Life of Bees

Plants – and humans – need pollinators to survive. Here’s how Floridians are creating corridors for them
Blog

As students grow milkweed, sunflowers, asters, parsley and other native plants at six schools in Florida, the gardens will help more than the pollinators that depend on the plants for survival.

Without bees, butterflies and other insects, humans won’t survive either. It’s a lesson teachers hope students in Volusia County take with them for life.

“We have to keep pollinators alive or we won’t live,” said Louise Chapman, environmental/STEM resource teacher. “Having pollinator corridors in protected areas will be wonderful.”

Consumers Energy | Bright Future Blooms

Pipeline restoration work creates new habitat for bees, butterflies
Article

Tom Hess has worked with many companies during his 28-year career as an environmental inspector.

In many cases, Hess has experienced clients who tolerate his environmental recommendations, or do only what’s required — often with pressure.

Thus, Hess wasn’t sure what to expect when he proposed spending extra money to restore construction areas on a major natural gas pipeline project for Michigan-based Consumers Energy. He suggested using seed mix containing native grasses and wildflowers to attract bees, butterflies and other pollinators losing habitat across the country.

BLOG | ScottsMiracle-Gro Foundation-Funded Research Shows 95% of Americans Support Pollinator Protection

Parks for Pollinators project seeks to turn this support into action
Blog

By Carol Nowlin
Manager, Corporate Social Responsibility, ScottsMiracle-Gro

OFA Supports Bees in France

Blog

At General Mills, we love bees. Not just Buzz Bee, the famed Honey Nut Cheerios mascot, but all bees. Here’s why:

Simply put, without bees, we wouldn’t have enough food to feed the world’s growing population.

As a global food company, this is very important for us.

Bees are responsible for pollinating the fruit, such as strawberries and blueberries, that go into our Yoplait yogurt and countless other products.

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