sea change radio

Get The Lead Out: Kevin Drum & Sarah Hess

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The policy decisions we make today will have an impact on the next hundred years and beyond. It kind of makes you think, what policy decisions from the last century are we dealing with today? This week on Sea Change Radio, we focus on lead, a heavy metal whose regulation was slow to follow the discovery that it was highly toxic. The lag time meant the widespread use of this hazardous element as an ingredient in everyday substances like gasoline and house paint, and a toxic legacy that is still being felt.

Walking in Our Footprints

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How will our current climate policies and actions be viewed by future generations? Our first guest this week on Sea Change Radio is pretty sure our descendants will be, “stunned by our obliviousness.”

Richard Heinberg: “The Quest” For Truth

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Last year, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and energy consultant Daniel Yergin published his long-awaited sequel to the The Prize called 

Coping With The Rising Tides: John Englander & David Hedman

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Our planet’s rising oceans are no longer the purview of pessimistic doomsayers – they are the new reality. This week’s guests on Sea Change Radio are both trying to help us adapt to the phenomenon of crumbling coastlines and swollen seas. 

Driving Change in What We Drive

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For better or for worse, cars are not leaving the American landscape anytime soon. The automobile is woven into the cultural fabric of our country like nothing else. But we also know that the status quo is not sustainable.

Frederick Kaufman: The Fix Is In (With All The Fixins)

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This week, along with the rest of the country, we'll be piling my plate high with abundant turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and apple pie. It seems like a fitting time to reflect on food. Today on Sea Change Radio, we check in again with leading food journalist Frederick Kaufman to discuss the factors that go into fluctuating food prices around the world.

Wind Blown: Ken Burns on “The Dustbowl”

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Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns has produced a new film series on the dustbowl. It features survivors, experts on climate and farming, as well as some amazing footage from the era. He’s our guest this week on Sea Change Radio. Burns and host Alex Wise discuss this important project, which is being released against the ominous backdrop of our current drought conditions.

Hurricane Sandy: A Climate Change Wake-Up Call?

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The devastation wreaked by Hurricane Sandy highlighted the real effects of a changing climate and rising sea levels like perhaps no other event we have seen in this country. This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks with Neela Banerjee, the energy and environment reporter for the Los Angeles Times, to discuss what effects Sandy might have on the media’s handling of climate change in the future and what political role climate change might play beyond the election.

GMO: Your Right To Know

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Like it or not, genetically engineered foods make up a significant portion of our nation’s food supply. Approximately ninety-three percent of all U.S. soy and canola and eighty-six percent of our corn are genetically modified. There are informed positions on both sides of the debate around genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, pertaining to the health and long-term safety of these food products. But many assert that as long as this debate still rages, consumers deserve to know whether they’re eating and serving foods that have been genetically modified.

Matt Wasson: A Mountain Hugger on the Myth of "Clean Coal"

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Do you cringe when you hear the term “clean coal?” Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio feels that this term is not only an oxymoron it’s offensive to the many communities all over the world who are forced to live with the devastating environmental and health impacts of this multi-billion dollar industry. Politicians, by contrast, seem to like the term, “clean coal” quite a bit.

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