The American Journal of Medicine

Novel Oral Anticoagulant Prescriptions Soar, But At A High Cost

Novel anticoagulants accounted for 62% of new prescriptions and 98% of anticoagulant-related healthcare dollars between 2010 and 2013, reports The American Journal of Medicine
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, August 20, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Warfarin, the longtime standard treatment for atrial fibrillation, is facing competition from new options in the anticoagulant drug marketplace including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban. A new study documents the rapid adoption of these novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into clinical practice. By mid-2013 NOACs accounted for 62% of all new anticoagulant prescriptions yet this represents 98% of total anticoagulant-related drug costs. Findings are published in The American Journal of Medicine.

Good News for an Aging Population: Incidence of Stroke in the Elderly Has Dropped by 40% Over the Last 20 Years

Good News for an Aging Population: Incidence of Stroke in the Elderly Has Dropped by 40% Over the Last 20 Years
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, July 18, 2014 /3BL Media/ – A new analysis of data from 1988-2008 has revealed a 40% decrease in the incidence of stroke in Medicare patients 65 years of age and older. This decline is greater than anticipated considering this population’s risk factors for stroke, and applies to both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Investigators also found death resulting from stroke declined during the same period. Their findings are published in the July issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

Less Exercise, Not More Calories, Responsible for Expanding Waistlines

Lack of leisure-time physical activity linked to increased obesity, particularly in young women, reports The American Journal of Medicine
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, July 8, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Sedentary lifestyle and not caloric intake may be to blame for increased obesity in the US, according to a new analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). A study published in The American Journal of Medicine reveals that in the past 20 years there has been a sharp decrease in physical exercise and an increase in average body mass index (BMI), while caloric intake has remained steady.

New Study Presents Evidence that Blood Pressure Should Be Measured in Both Arms

Difference in interarm blood pressure linked to greater risk of future cardiovascular events, reports The American Journal of Medicine
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, February 26, 2014 /3BL Media/ – As heart disease continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the United States, practitioners and patients alike are looking for ways to cut risk factors and identify new clues to assist with early detection.

New Analysis Suggests Whole Diet Approach to Lower Cardiovascular Risk Has More Evidence Than Low-Fat Diets

Mediterranean-style diets most successful, reports The American Journal of Medicine
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, February 6, 2014 /3BL Media/ – A study published in The American Journal of Medicine reveals that a whole diet approach, which focuses on increased intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and fish, has more evidence for reducing cardiovascular risk than strategies that focus exclusively on reduced dietary fat. This new study explains that while strictly low-fat diets have the ability to lower cholesterol, they are not as conclusive in reducing cardiac deaths.

For Breast Cancer Screening, One Size Doesn’t Fit All

New findings reported in The American Journal of Medicine
Press Release

Philadelphia, Pa., April 8, 2013 /3BL Media/ – Although mammography, the gold standard of breast cancer screening, reduces breast cancer mortality, it has important limitations. Critics point to reduced sensitivity for women with dense breasts, a high rate of false positives leading to excessive biopsies, and concerns about long-term effects of repeated radiation.

Subscribe to The American Journal of Medicine