Water Conservation

The Water Revolution is Here

Blog

At current usage and population rates, international demand for water in 2030 will outstrip supply by 40 percent. As fresh water supplies dwindle, nations across the globe will face unprecedented, unsettling, and formerly unthinkable choices regarding water, compelled to make difficult decisions about how to allocate the precious resource.

Managing Stormwater

These eco-sensitive strategies help keep pollutants out of streams and lakes, replenish groundwater and green the built environment.
Article

Natural landscapes naturally slow the movement of stormwater, and capture and filter some of it as it percolates back into the groundwater supply. But the built environment is dominated by impervious surfaces. Paved surfaces, roofs and building façades change the movement of water over the landscape and increase the volume, speed and temperature of the runoff. Rushing stormwater picks up pollutants, fertilizers and pesticides and can also cause flooding and erosion.

Graywater Reuse

Now that codes are finally getting friendlier, it’s time to start incorporating graywater recycling into landscape plans.
Blog

Graywater is used household water that has not come into contact with toilet wastewater. It represents two-thirds of a typical household’s indoor water budget. Reusing graywater to irrigate landscaping keeps it onsite and conserves potable water, easing the burden on both water treatment and wastewater treatment plants. Unfortunately, state regulations have made legal use of graywater difficult, if not impossible—although that is changing.

Key Learnings in Sustainable Water Stewardship

Blog

As a company, water stewardship has been a key pillar of our sustainability mission for years. In the last year, I’ve been fortunate enough to observe firsthand the evolution of our water stewardship strategy.  I’ve also watched the culture of water stewardship evolve beyond our corporate hallways to new heights of impact.

World Water Day: Water Stewardship is Not Just a Drop in the Bucket for Keurig Green Mountain

By Monique Oxender, Chief Sustainability Officer, Keurig Green Mountain, Inc.
Blog

Over the last several years, extreme climate changes have impacted rainfall patterns and water availability, intensifying the global water crisis and leading to food shortages in many parts of the world.

Nestlé Waters and Project WET Sign New 4-year Partnership and Come Together Again Globally for World Water Day on March 22nd, 2015

Press Release

PARIS, March 17, 2015 /3BL Media/ - World Water Day, organized each year on March 22nd by the United Nations, provides an opportunity for Nestlé Waters and Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) to raise awareness about the importance of water conservation and hydration.

To view the Multimedia News Release, please click:

Water Conservation: Putting It All Together

The water crisis will prompt us not only to rethink our approach to landscaping, but how we treat, use and recycle water inside our homes.
Article

WATER SECURITY IS a growing concern, not just in arid developing nations, but here in the United States. Public awareness is starting to catch up with this reality. According to the EPA, many of the states that have projected population growth increases also have higher per capita water use. This translates into heightened competition for an already limited resource. But the consequences of climate change, including unpredictable and prolonged droughts, are already spurring watering restrictions and higher utility rates.

Kohler India Team Navigates a Sustainability Roadblock by Rethinking Everything

Our Jhagadia, India, plant now uses 1/6th the amount of water used at other Kohler faucet plants.
Article

How do you reuse water sustainably? You use it to water the grass, of course. Well, not always, as our faucets team in India found out.

Plating faucets (meaning, adding the finish to them) requires a lot of rinsing to wash away impurities that affect quality. Much of this water can be treated and then reused, but some cannot. The agents used to treat the parts contain salts that are too fine to be removed.

Now you wouldn’t want to dump salt-ridden water on grass, right?

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