Local Farming CSR News

Let’s Play a Game

Blog

Ever since I was a little kid, I’ve loved games. I’m pretty sure my parents could have manipulated me into doing whatever they wanted by calling it a game. “John, I bet you can’t be silent longer than me during this five-hour car ride. Ready? Go!” Or, “John, do you think you can eat all of your vegetables in the next 60 seconds?”

...I’m encouraged by the recent trend of gamification, in particular its applications in the environmental space.

Native Species for an Indigenous City

RSF Social Finance Seed Fund Grantee Highlight
Blog

Arc of Greater New Orleans has evolved much since its inception in 1953. Today, the organization is a culmination of decades of work by devoted individuals whose ultimate goal is to integrate people with intellectual disabilities into their communities. Arc serves some 900 children, adults and their families in Jefferson, Orleans, St. Bernard, and St. Tammany Parishes by providing various services such as child care, family service coordination, and supported living assistance.

RSF Social Finance Reflects on NC’s Shared Gifting

Blog

By Kelley Buhles

What is the best way to distribute money amongst a group a non-profits? This is a question that foundations and donors struggle with on a regular basis. Non-profits, the ones on the receiving end of these decisions, don’t often get to take up this question. In an effort to change this common dynamic in philanthropy, RSF Social Finance held a meeting in the Triangle Area of North Carolina in September.

Leave It in the Ground: Carbon and the Future of the Planet

Article

Originally published in the Fall 2015 RSF Quarterly

by Stephanie and Chris Tebbutt, Filigreen Farm

As farmers, we are rooted in the reality of place. Everything we do depends upon how we replenish and foster the six inches of fragile, living topsoil under our feet. So, too, for our fellow workers, the people we feed, the markets we serve, and, ultimately, the viability of the farm.

That Grantmaker Plays a Mean Bass Guitar

Blog

My only disappointment was that they didn’t smash a guitar.

Actually, looking back, I’m glad they didn’t. That would have been wasteful, and such destructive behavior really wasn’t as “cool” in their later years. The Who could still put on an incredible concert though.

Brightening Our Corner - Fall 2015

Ray C. Anderson Foundation
Newsletter

Biomimicry Global Design Challenge 2015 Names Finalists. New Challenge Opens
Hundreds of innovators from around the world engaged in the 2015 Biomimicry Global Design Challenge (BGDC) to improve our global food system by looking to nature for design solutions. Eight finalist team were announced September 30 before traveling to Austin, TX for a special Biomimicry Conference at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center on October 4.

A New Kind of Olympics

by John Anderson Lanier
Blog

So what would the Olympics look like in non-sports form? Let’s assume the whole world was willing to gather for some other purpose, sending official delegations, national leaders, support staff and even fans to one city for two weeks. What if that gathering captured the same spirit of hope and enthusiasm that permeates the Olympic Games? Perhaps the focus could even be something as ambitious as solving climate change. Can you imagine that?

Salmon Farming: First Nations as Partners

Multimedia with summary

First Nation entrepreneur, James Walkus, owner of the multi-generation, family-run James Walkus Fishing Company, credits a large part of his success on his partnership with Marine Harvest Canada. Walkus, who started in the commercial fishing business, now uses his 105' harvest boat (the Amarissa Joye) to transport salmon from the farms to the processing plant in Port Hardy, located on the north-eastern coast of Vancouver Island.

To Conserve, Protect, and Eat Healthy

Summary: 

Since 1998, November 21st has been recognized as World Fisheries day. For the past 18 years the discussion on this globally important day has focused on a simple question: how to feed fish to a growing global population while protecting the health of aquatic ecosystems and fish populations. 

Sadly the global appetite for fish has not been matched by commitment to conserving the habitats and stocks necessary for sustained harvest.

Article

Since 1998, November 21st has been recognized as World Fisheries day. For the past 18 years the discussion on this globally important day has focused on a simple question: how to feed fish to a growing global population while protecting the health of aquatic ecosystems and fish populations. 

Sadly the global appetite for fish has not been matched by commitment to conserving the habitats and stocks necessary for sustained harvest.

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