FSG

Are You Ready for a World of Purpose-Led Companies?

Blog

We’re reaching a tipping point in purpose-led companies, as governments, investors and consumers increasingly indicate that they prefer companies that address global problems through competitive and profitable strategies. But many companies have not yet awakened to that reality to rethink how they will compete effectively in this new world.

Three Ways Funders Can Be Co-Strategists

Blog

Last week, a few of my colleagues and I had the pleasure of attending Change Philanthropy’s Unity Summit, a biennial gathering that now brings together more than 1,000 Philanthrofolk—philanthropic equity activists and allies—from across the country.

Bringing a Pediatrician's Perspective to Philanthropy

Lauren Smith Joins the Business of Giving Podcast
Article

This edition of the Business of Giving features Lauren Smith, co-CEO of consulting firm FSG. Formerly Foundation Strategy Group, its goal is to facilitate impact on complex social problems by encouraging collaboration across multiple sectors and perspectives. Smith, a pediatrician, particularly likes to focus on the well-being of communities.

Business As Usual Will Not Save the Planet

By Mark R. Kramer, Rishi Agarwal, and Aditi Srinivas
Article

The United Nations’ 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) were explicitly designed to engage the private sector in addressing the world’s most pressing challenges. Four years into the UN’s 15-year timeline, the question is whether companies are advancing serious solutions or are simply embarking on a massive global public relations charade. Unfortunately, our internal research points to the latter.

Institutional Investor: Where ESG Fails

By Michael E. Porter & George Serafeim & Mark Kramer
Summary: 

Despite countless studies, there has never been conclusive evidence that socially responsible screens deliver alpha. A better model exists, argue Harvard Business School luminaries Michael Porter, George Serafeim, and Mark Kramer.

Article

Despite countless studies, there has never been conclusive evidence that socially responsible screens deliver alpha. A better model exists, argue Harvard Business School luminaries Michael Porter, George Serafeim, and Mark Kramer.

Published in Colombia: The Business of Solving Social Problems

by Dane Smith, Laura Amaya
Summary: 

A version of this blog post was published in Spanish, in the financial newspaper ‘Portafolio’, as part of the special issue on Empresas INspiradoras, which recognizes companies adopting a shared value approach. For a second year in a row, FSG worked closely with Colombian National Industry Association (ANDI) to develop a set of selection criteria that were appropriate for Colombia’s business and socio-political context. These included:  the scale of measurable social impact of a shared value strategy, its contribution to the company’s profitability and competitive advantage, and the degree to which the strategy supports the inclusion of historically underserved or marginalized groups.

Chocó is one of Colombia’s most impoverished regions, with 48% of people living in poverty. It also has the highest unemployment rate in the country, at 17%. In 2013, Telefónica Moister set up a call center in the city of Quibdó, Chocó’s capital. Beyond the potential for impact, Telefónica Movistar saw a strong business opportunity in this new venture. The investment paid off – the Quibdó call center employs 150 people, and has generated significant cost savings for the company as a result of having staff turnover rates 50% lower than other call centers across the country.  With the Quibdó call center, Telefónica Movistar is adopting a shared value approach. It is increasing its profitability by solving a social problem.

Blog

A version of this blog post was published in Spanish, in the financial newspaper ‘Portafolio’, as part of the special issue on Empresas INspiradoras, which recognizes companies adopting a shared value approach. For a second year in a row, FSG worked closely with Colombian National Industry Association (ANDI) to develop a set of selection criteria that were appropriate for Colombia’s business and socio-political context. These included:  the scale of measurable social impact of a shared value strategy, its contribution to the company’s profitability and competitive advantage, and the degree to which the strategy supports the inclusion of historically underserved or marginalized groups.

Chocó is one of Colombia’s most impoverished regions, with 48% of people living in poverty. It also has the highest unemployment rate in the country, at 17%. In 2013, Telefónica Moister set up a call center in the city of Quibdó, Chocó’s capital. Beyond the potential for impact, Telefónica Movistar saw a strong business opportunity in this new venture. The investment paid off – the Quibdó call center employs 150 people, and has generated significant cost savings for the company as a result of having staff turnover rates 50% lower than other call centers across the country.  With the Quibdó call center, Telefónica Movistar is adopting a shared value approach. It is increasing its profitability by solving a social problem.

FSG Welcomes John Harper As Managing Director

Press Release

BOSTON, September 17, 2019 /3BL Media/—FSG, one of the world’s leading advisors on creating social impact, is thrilled to welcome its newest managing director, John Harper, to its consulting team. 

FSG Releases New Primer on Advancing Racial Equity and Competitive Advantage

Press Release

BOSTON, July 31, 2019 /3BL Media/ — As more corporate leaders pledge their commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion, they need a way to fulfill their promises. FSG’s new primer, Reckoning, Repair, and Change: How Business Leaders Can More Effectively Advance Racial Equity and Competitive Advantage is designed to help companies transform those pledges into action.

How Companies and Corporate Foundations Can Elevate CSR Strategy

Press Release

Corporate leaders are increasingly seeking innovative solutions to social and economic problems—not only do they want to do good, but they also recognize that their stakeholders require and demand it.

How Financial Services Companies Can Advance Racial Equity and Create Business Growth

Press Release

April 17, 2019 /3BL Media/ — Historically, financial institutions in the United States have not served people of color effectively or fairly. Even today, people of color have less access to credit, pay higher interest rates for loans, and are less likely to receive venture capital funding as compared to their White counterparts. Serving these markets effectively is not only a moral imperative, but also an economic opportunity to enhance a company’s bottom line.

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