Kenya

VIDEO | Investing in Bamboo to Curb Floods in Kenya

In Kenya, floods and landslides killed around 100 people and displaced nearly 300,000 between March and May 2018. Smallholder farmers along the Upper Tana River basin are now investing in bamboo trees to curb floods.
Article

Many of the Kenyan communities affected by floods and landslides this year were already struggling to recover from the 2017 drought - a result of a failed rainy season in 2016 and unusually high temperatures.

"The rainfall patterns have completely shifted. We are receiving more torrential rains of high intensity, accompanied by flooding," Catherine Muthuri, a research scientist at the World Agroforestry Center in Nairobi, told DW.

What Kenya Needs to Do to Take Advantage of Its Rainfall

Article

by Maibo Malesu, Theme Leader, Water Management, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

For the past month Kenya has had torrential rainfall. This followed devastating droughts in parts of the country. The Conversation Africa’s Moina Spooner asked Maimbo Malesu how the country can make better use of the rains.

What is rainwater harvesting and how does it work?

Agroforestry Gives Kenyan Indigenous Community a Lifeline

Summary: 
  • The Cherangani people of Kenya were for generations reliant on the forest for hunting, gathering and agroforestry — a way of life that was curtailed by the colonial government.
  • Today, Cherangani communities living on the edge of the forest have returned to their traditions, intercropping avocado, bean and coffee plants among trees that help reduce water runoff and soil erosion, and improve nutrient cycling.
  • The return to agroforestry has had wide-ranging benefits, from helping the communities improve their livelihoods, to minimizing human-animal conflicts by providing a buffer of fruit trees between the farms and forest.
  • The project has received $5 million in funding, which is expected to provide training to more than 2,000 households on forest conservation and agroforestry techniques.
Article
  • The Cherangani people of Kenya were for generations reliant on the forest for hunting, gathering and agroforestry — a way of life that was curtailed by the colonial government.
  • Today, Cherangani communities living on the edge of the forest have returned to their traditions, intercropping avocado, bean and coffee plants among trees that help reduce water runoff and soil erosion, and improve nutrient cycling.
  • The return to agroforestry has had wide-ranging benefits, from helping the communities improve their livelihoods, to minimizing human-animal conflicts by providing a buffer of fruit trees between the farms and forest.
  • The project has received $5 million in funding, which is expected to provide training to more than 2,000 households on forest conservation and agroforestry techniques.

Impact Measurement Impacting Lives: How Female Coffee Farmers in Kenya Are Improving Yields and Incomes With Data

by Vava Angwenyi, Founder & Chief Coffaholic Vava Coffee; Co-founder & Director Gente Del Futuro
Blog

I write this reeling from the recent surge in market visibility for women coffee farmers in Kenya’s Rift Valley. These women have been working tirelessly to improve coffee quality, increase volumes to record highs and diversify their revenue streams to include freshly-roasted packaged coffee.

LIXIL to Provide UN-Habitat with Sanitation Facilities for Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement

LIXIL’s Green Toilet System to help improve sanitation and self-reliance for refugees and host communities
Press Release

TOKYO, March 6, 2018 /3BL Media/ – LIXIL Corporation (LIXIL), a global leader in the housing and buildings industry, announced today it has been awarded a contract by UN-Habitat to provide its Green Toilet System – a waterless and sustainable sanitation solution - for the Kalobeyei refugee settlement in Turkana County, Kenya. Designed for areas without access to water and sewage systems, the Green Toilet System will improve access to clean and safe toilets in the settlement and help refugees become more economically self-reliant by converting waste into fertilizer for crops.

Women in Kenya Improve Their Families’ Food Security Through Simple Land-Restoration Technology

Despite challenges from both the land and society, women are taking control of their farms, with impressive results
Blog

Agricultural innovations in Africa aimed at improving the productivity of smallholders, especially women, are necessarily subject to accommodating multiple needs, which in turn depend on differing priorities, preferences and access to resources.

Renting an ox-drawn plough, for example, operated by young, able-bodied men is not an easy option for many cash-strapped farmers, particularly the women who make up the majority of farmers in the drylands of what is known as Kambaland in southeastern Kenya.

A Pick and a Spade May Triple Farmers’ Yields in the Kenyan Drylands

A simple farming technique is proving effective in staving off food shortages in Kenya
Blog

The female farmers of Makueni County in southeastern Kenya rarely expect to triumph over their parched, unpropitious soils. A pick, a spade and a jovial, no-nonsense, will-to-survive scarcely seem sufficient for a transition to greener prospects. In addition, the need for cash frequently robs these hardy women of their men’s presence; casual labour in economic hotspots, or other work in livestock and poultry trading, is the norm. Producing the food thus rests on the shoulders of the women, many of whom are subsistence farmers or smallholders burdened with increasingly unproductive land.

Bringing Light to People Across the World

Teachers like Joseph Alter, and their students, are supplying energy to countries without access to electricity, thanks to We Share Solar® Suitcases and support from Wells Fargo.
Blog

Hilltop Special Services Center teacher Joseph Alter was looking for hands-on learning activities for his high school students in San Francisco when a colleague told him about We Share Solar. Now his students will help provide energy to people in other countries who don’t have access to electricity — and they are discovering new career opportunities.

VIDEO | Schneider Electric Uses Solar Power to Illuminate Primary Schools for 45K Students in Africa

Multimedia with summary

Today nearly 1.3 billion people — almost 1 of every 5 persons on the planet — lack access to modern energy. Almost all live in poverty in rural sub-Saharan Africa and developing Asia, unconnected to utility networks. Many companies offer stand-alone solar powered systems and mini-grid solutions, but the target communities often cannot afford the purchase price and lack the know-how to operate the systems.

Supporting and Elevating Talent Around the World

Summary: 

This post was guest-written by Juliana Rotich, a consultant at Novato Africa, technologist, strategic advisor, entrepreneur, and keynote speaker. She is the co-founder of BRCK Inc, a hardware and services technology company based in Nairobi, Kenya, and Ushahidi, a non-profit tech company, which specializes in developing free and open source software for changing how information flows in the world.

Blog

This post was guest-written by Juliana Rotich, a consultant at Novato Africa, technologist, strategic advisor, entrepreneur, and keynote speaker. She is the co-founder of BRCK Inc, a hardware and services technology company based in Nairobi, Kenya, and Ushahidi, a non-profit tech company, which specializes in developing free and open source software for changing how information flows in the world.

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