SEC

Conflict Minerals Argument Over. Impossible? Over a Thousand Did It

Article

If the SEC posted a filing deadline and no one filed, Section 1502 of Dodd-Frank would have been a failure. Instead, public companies provided a resounding answer to the call for greater transparency. Now, NGO’s are reporting that over two-thirds of the mines that were run by militias four years ago are no longer under their control.

Uzbek Cotton Surprises Still Being Revealed. Daewoo making headlines.

Blog

Unwanted surprises in company’s supply chains are found and amplified often causing serious damage to a corporation's most valuable intangible asset: its brand. That is what has happened to Daewoo with the recent petition to stop operations in Uzbekistan and publicly pledge its opposition to the Uzbek government’s forced labor system. Surprises were also recently uncovered during the conflict minerals filing process with the SEC, in which it was revealed that gold was sourced by several companies from North Korea.

Conflict Minerals Due Diligence Leading the Way for Better Supply Chain Risk Management

Article

The unprecedented depth of the due diligence process required for conflict minerals compliance is uncovering surprises and risks that would have remained hidden without Section 1502 in place. Nearly 1,300 companies filed with the SEC as part of the conflict minerals compliance this past Monday. These companies now have a distinct competitive advantage: they have uncovered risks involved in managing all of the suppliers who engaged during their due diligence process. However, gaining this engagement and gathering this data from suppliers is not easy.

Think It’ll be Easy to get Your Suppliers to Engage on Conflict Minerals by Yourself? Think Again.

Article

Although nearly 1,300 public companies have filed with the SEC for Conflict Minerals compliance, over 95% of these companies said that they did not know the source of their 3TG (tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold). The primary reason they filed “indeterminable” is because they could not get their suppliers to engage in the process. However, public companies will not be able to file “undeterminable” forever. And, the issue of suppliers either not knowing what to do, or not feeling compelled to do it – if they understood what to do – will remain.

Think It’ll be Easy to get Your Suppliers to Engage on Conflict Minerals by Yourself? Think Again.

Article

Although nearly 1,300 public companies have filed with the SEC for Conflict Minerals compliance, over 95% of these companies said that they did not know the source of their 3TG (tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold). The primary reason they filed “indeterminable” is because they could not get their suppliers to engage in the process. However, public companies will not be able to file “undeterminable” forever. And, the issue of suppliers either not knowing what to do, or not feeling compelled to do it – if they understood what to do – will remain.

Kemet, Intel, Apple, HP Sets Best Example For Conflict Minerals

Article

Of the companies filing form SD and Conflict Mineral reports with the SEC this past Monday, a few raised the bar. Only a handful of these companies could declare “DRC Conflict Free” or “Portion DRC Conflict Free”. Even fewer, including Intel Corporation (INTC) and KEMET Corp. (KEM), conducted an Independent Private Sector Audit (IPSA) and named their auditor in the report. Apple and Hewlett-Packard also set positive examples, publishing full lists of suppliers and smelters, respectively. However, the vast majority of companies chose to file indeterminable.

Initial Conflict Minerals Filers Reluctant to be Transparent

Article

The deadline for public companies’ first disclosure to the SEC on conflict minerals arrived on Monday, June 2nd. The vast majority of filers are stating in their filings that they have not yet been able to determine the source of their tin, tantalum, tungsten, or gold (3TG).

Sustainability Accounting Standards Board Names Michael Bloomberg as Board Chair

by Vikas Vij
Blog

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Mary Schapiro have taken up leadership positions with the Sustainable Accounting Standards Board (SASB). Bloomberg has been named as board chair and Schapiro as vice-chair of the organization.

Inadequate Action by Securities & Exchange Commission on Climate Change, Report Says

Corporate disclosure of climate risks and opportunities lags despite 2010 requirement
Press Release

BOSTON, Feb. 6, 2014 /3BL Media/ – The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has not adequately addressed the climate disclosure deficiencies of publicly traded corporations, despite four-year-old formal guidance requiring companies to disclose material climate change risks, according to a report published by Ceres today. 

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