texas trees foundation

How Rising Temps in DFW Lead to a Data-Driven Solution

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Listening closely to our clients. Digging deeper to understand their goals and challenges. Collaborating with them on innovative solutions. These are critical to our business success – and guide our approach to community relationships.

When our partners at Texas Trees Foundation told us about rising temperatures in Dallas – and the associated effects on public health, infrastructure and the local economy – we listened. Then we funded a comprehensive urban heat island study to learn more.

It's Not Your Imagination, Dallas Is Getting Hotter — And Here's Why

by Janette Monear and Ed Heffernan
Blog

Dallas is hot. But the favorable economy brings with it a hotter issue: urban heat. In fact, among cities with a population greater than 1 million, excluding Phoenix, Dallas is heating up faster than every other city in the country.

VIDEO | See How Texas Trees Foundation and Alliance Data Are Working to Reverse Dallas’ Rising Temps

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Dallas is the second-fastest warming city in the United States, according to Texas Trees Foundation's Urban Heat Island Management Study of Dallas and its surrounding areas. The study, which was sponsored by Alliance Data, determined, "Cities do not cause heat waves - they amplify them." The ramifications of urban heat adversely affect public health, longevity of infrastructure, public opinion, and our economy. And the data from this study reveals that trees help mitigate rising temperatures, improve health of community, offset carbon emissions.

In Dallas as in Phoenix, People Look to Trees for Relief from Urban Heat Islands

by Brandon Loomis
Summary: 

Dallas and Phoenix are the fastest warming cities in the United States, and while both cities will always be hot, an article published by the Arizona Republic details how these cities are working to balance economic growth and environmental sustainability to reduce temperatures and improve the health and quality of life of its residents. In 2017, the Texas Trees Foundation conducted an Urban Heat Island Management Study of Dallas and its surrounding areas. The study, funded by Alliance Data and considered one of the most comprehensive urban heat studies in the country, found that more than one-third of Dallas is covered in concrete and commercial and residential buildings. The solution? The study found more green spaces, i.e. trees, can offset the concrete and other impervious surfaces in these growing regions. See how planting more trees in both cities is changing and saving lives.

Article

Dallas and Phoenix are the fastest warming cities in the United States, and while both cities will always be hot, an article published by the Arizona Republic details how these cities are working to balance economic growth and environmental sustainability to reduce temperatures and improve the health and quality of life of its residents. In 2017, the Texas Trees Foundation conducted an Urban Heat Island Management Study of Dallas and its surrounding areas. The study, funded by Alliance Data and considered one of the most comprehensive urban heat studies in the country, found that more than one-third of Dallas is covered in concrete and commercial and residential buildings. The solution? The study found more green spaces, i.e. trees, can offset the concrete and other impervious surfaces in these growing regions. See how planting more trees in both cities is changing and saving lives.

Texas Trees Foundation Announces New Dallas Urban Heat Island Effect Report and Findings, Sponsored by Alliance Data and Wells Fargo

Summary: 
  • Dallas county heating up second-fastest in United States
  • Data reveals trees help mitigate rising temperatures, improve health of community, offset carbon emissions
  • Study to help inform, drive action for municipalities, urban developers and corporations
Press Release
  • Dallas county heating up second-fastest in United States
  • Data reveals trees help mitigate rising temperatures, improve health of community, offset carbon emissions
  • Study to help inform, drive action for municipalities, urban developers and corporations

Texas Trees, Alliance Data and American Forests Conduct Urban Heat Island Study to Understand the Effects of Trees, Paved Surfaces and Buildings on Temperature and Air Quality in Dallas County

Urban Heat Island Study Results Highlight the Critical Environmental, Social and Economic Role of the Region's Tree Canopy
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Alliance Data, and Texas Trees Foundation, in conjunction with American Forests, the oldest national conservation organization in the United States, teamed up to implement the urban heat island study in Dallas County, which identifies where the region is experiencing high urban heat island temperatures and the associated effect on air quality, and where greater tree canopy coverage could mitigate the issue. The study also uncovered that Dallas is the second largest city in the country that is warming the fastest, which means hotter nights and even hotter days.

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